Alexis Mazey

About Alexis Mazey

Small-town Ohio native and sophomore Adolescence English Education major at Nyack Rockland. Lover of books, coffee, and nature. My talents include eating, consuming too much caffeine, napping, and making things awkward. Oxford comma supporter.

7 Steps for Admittance into the School of Education

Whether you’re a senior or an incoming freshman, planning for and navigating through deadlines and prerequisites can seem daunting. I would know, because that’s how I felt going into my freshman year. I’d be lying if I said it didn’t still seem that way at times. With that in mind, I spoke to a few Nyack veterans regarding admittance to Nyack’s School of Education (SoE) in an attempt to make the process a little more clear for those of you wanting to join the SoE community. Here is a basic guideline of what you will need to do for admittance:

1. Declare Your Major
Your first step in becoming a teacher is deciding who and what you wish to teach. Everyone seems to think I’m crazy, but my favorite group to teach is middle schoolers, so I chose Adolescence Education. I commend those of you who have the patience and energy to teach the wee little ones. You are a special breed.
In case you aren’t sure of the degree breakdown, here it is:
Early Childhood Education: birth-grade 2
Childhood Education: grades 1-6
Early Childhood/Childhood: birth- grade 6
Adolescence Education: grades 7-12

2. Help Out
Every teacher candidate is required to complete 30 hours of community service to students in their certification age group. The community service is going to look differently for everyone depending on the specific major, and I will have a few ideas for you in a future post. For instance, I will be coaching and teaching at church camps this summer, but the possibilities are endless.

3. Get Good Grades
In order to be a part of the SoE at Nyack, you need to have an overall cumulative GPA of at least 3.0, a cumulative 3.0 GPA in your concentration, and a cumulative education GPA of 3.0, earning a C or better in any education course taken. If you earn less than a C in any given education course, you will need to retake the course.

4. Pass the School of Education Admissions Test (SEAT)
Students used to be required by NYS to take the ALST, but things have since changed. Nyack has now created their own exam, the SEAT. Talk to your advisor and sign up to the exam.

5. Be A Decent Human Being
You must pass a faculty review of dispositions, passing being 80% and higher.

6.Apply to the School of Education
This application also includes an essay. Don’t freak out about it. Completing the coursework and exams were the hard part, and they prepared you well.

Any forms you need can be found on Nyack’s School of Education’s website.

If you have any questions regarding admission to the School of Education, feel free to contact Nyack Admissions

Why I Chose Teaching as a Profession

People have been asking me what I want to do with my life since I came out of the womb, and even more frequently since I graduated high school. I’m sure that you know how that goes.

I knew what I wanted to do, at least in part, since I was a small child, and that passion hasn’t changed. I have always wanted to become a teacher, and I cannot imagine doing anything else, nor do I think that anything else would bring me as much joy as the classroom does.

Even though I knew teaching to be my calling, I had tried to convince myself otherwise, convince myself to pursue another career path, but it was to no avail. When I was in elementary school, I tried to convince myself that I wanted to be a chef. I would get to be around food all day, and that seemed amazing! I even went to a cooking school that summer. (I now make an amazing cavatelli and Bolognese from scratch, in case you were wondering.) I learned from an amazing woman, and I will never forget her. The reason I will never forget her is for her teaching, for her passion and ability to teach that to others. My desire to become a teacher was reaffirmed with her.

Years passed before I had truly given extensive thought to my career path again. Sitting in Mrs. Durieux’s 9th grade English class, I was assigned to choose the top three careers that I would be interested in pursuing. Naturally, my first choice was teaching. Second was Cytotechnology, something in the medical field to appease my mother. The third was pediatrics, which I didn’t even remember I chose until I looked up the paper right now. (Are you amazed that I can still find the file? Because I certainly am.)

I chose the other two careers to appease others and their hopes for me, not because they were things I truly wanted. Sure, I love the science that was required for the other careers, but that love in no way compares to my love of the classroom and students.

I’m not going into education to make the kind of money a doctor does. (But if anyone knows how to make that kind of salary happen, feel free to contact me.) I’m going into education for my future students, to shape and guide them the way my teachers have shaped and guided me. I can say without a doubt that I would not be the woman I am today without my educators, those who taught me not only about their subject matter, but about life and what it means to be a decent human being.

I chose teaching primarily because I believe it to be the calling that God has placed on my life, but also because of how highly I esteem it. Furthermore, few things bring me more joy than watching the light go on in a student’s head when they finally grasp a concept- not even my first cup of coffee in the morning. Although perhaps an even better feeling would be when a student doesn’t look at your classroom like it’s a prison, but like it’s a home. And that is my main aim as a future educator.

New Education Blogger Debut

Welcome! I’m so glad you’ve joined me.

My name is Alexis, and I am the new blogger for the School of Education here at the Rockland Campus.

My birth certificate says Alexis Mazey, but you probably know me as Rex, as I am affectionately called that by friends. And no, it is not because I have short arms.

I grew up in a small town in Northeast Ohio. Now when I say small, I mean a two-stoplight town, a my-backyard-is-a-cornfield town.  (I’m not kidding. My sister once invited her friends over to watch Children of the Corn and then got some other friends to jump out of our cornfield and scare people. Even my dad was in on the prank. Honestly hysterical.)

Growing up in such a rural town has given me a deep appreciation for nature. My family and I used to hike at a local park when I was younger, and hiking is still one of my favorite things to do. I find running on a treadmill to be an impossibly boring form of exercise, but kudos to those of you who can last for more than five minutes without your lungs wanting to explode. I cannot. Better than me having to run, I could hike for ages and not grow weary of it. Well, at least not mentally. I have yet to reach John Muir’s stamina.

Anyway, moving on.

Besides hiking or simply being outside, my passions include reading, drinking coffee, and eating. My favorite combination of these passions was backpacking through part of the Appalachian Trail last May. The trip was impossibly arduous and taxing, and it made me realize that I need to work-out more (confession: I need to start doing the working out thing), but the overall experience was amazing, despite my pained knees and tired feet. There is something magnificently beautiful and rewarding about hiking to the top of a mountain and seeing God’s creation in bloom. If you ever need to be reminded about how truly amazing our God is, just look around you.

In fact, I would recommend that you look around you right now for that reminder. I went to a STEMM high school, so I am constantly reminded by science how God created such complexities and intricate organisms simply by speaking. I am also a musician and marvel about how He created sounds such that certain waves go together to create such beautiful harmonies.

Those are just some creations that make me reflect and stand in awe of our Creator. What about yours?

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